Can You dig?

Avalanche Rescue

Avalanche Rescue Course participants celebrate with their Certificate of Completion

Chicks Climbing and Skiing Joins Force with the Silverton Avalanche School

Avalanche Rescue Course trip report by Angela Hawse, co-owner Chicks Climbing and Skiing, IFMGA Mountain Guide

Hello Chicks!

I could not be more stoked about this new partnership between Chicks Climbing and Skiing and the Silverton Avalanche School.

In December, Sandy Kobrock and I hosted three one-day Avalanche Rescue courses.

Despite lack of snow, the courses were hugely successful—17 women from all over the state, and as far away as California, joined us in Ouray, Telluride and Silverton.

The Chicks Avalanche Rescue course is recognized by the American Avalanche Association (A3) as a pre-requisite for the Level 2 course and as a requirement for the PRO Level 1 and 2 courses.

We’re just getting this Avalanche Beta party started! Oh yeah—BIG CONGRATS, HIGH FIVES, GO YOU to all those who took the initiative to train for the unimaginable. Your partners are lucky.

Going up a skin track in the backcountry ©AveryStonich

Going up a skin track in the backcountry ©Angela Hawse

Skiing deep powder snow in the backcountry. ©AveryStonich

Skiing deep powder snow in the backcountry. ©AveryStonich

 

 

 

 

Caution! The Avalanche Rescue Course could be habit forming; it might spark backcountry addiction. We’ll be proudly responsible if you take another course, get an alpine touring set up and learn how to backcountry ski!

 

 

 

 

Choose backcountry partners carefully, training matters.

Did you know that avalanche transceiver searches are easy to practice anywhere that has tall grass, sand, wood chips, etc?

1) There are no tracks in the snow leading to the buried transceiver, giving it away.
2) It’s easier to focus on the essentials—executing the signal, course, fine and pinpoint searches—without the added challenge of moving over snow with ski or riding equipment on.
3) A baseball field or vacant ski slope is very accessible. Folks are more likely to get out and train early season.

Practicing Companion Rescue in woodchips ©Angela Hawse

Practicing Companion Rescue in woodchips ©Angela Hawse

That said, there is nothing like the real thing:

1) It is essential that you are skilled in moving over snow with your skis or board on.
2) You must practice in a snowy environment when it comes to moving large volumes of snow in a short amount of time—it’s hard work!
3) Practice. Practice. Practice digging the way we taught when you have some snow to work with.
4) If you are wondering, “What’s the best way to dig?” visit the Silverton Avalanche School website for more avalanche courses and additional all-women’s backcountry winter offerings at http://avyschool.com/project/new-partnership-with-chicks-climbing-and-skiing/.

And, if you’re a backcountry ice climber, check out the Women’s Avalanche Rescue and Safety for Ice Climbers with Kitty Calhoun in January that focuses on the hazards and rescue skills specific to ice climbing.

Best in Snow,

Angela Hawse

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