Growth Through Training and Education

Chicks Continuing EducationLife is an adventure and we never know where it will take us.

I was afraid of heights when I was a teenager, but by the time I finished college, all I wanted to do was to learn more about alpine climbing in ranges throughout the world.  I knew that I could only afford to do so by becoming a guide or a sponsored climber.  I never dreamed I could become a sponsored climber so I chose to become a guide and worked for the American Alpine Institute in Alaska, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and Nepal.  Along the way, I did some personal climbs that attracted attention and eventually I did become a sponsored climber. As Chicks Co-Owner Karen Bockel states in her story of becoming a Certified IFMGA Guide, we all reach a fork in our path. When I was offered sponsorship opportunities, I chose that path over becoming a certified guide. I was doing what I loved, getting paid to travel the world and climb.

Why is it important to hire a certified guide?

I think Chicks Co-Owner Angela Hawse sums it up best. In this excerpt from her blog she explains why you should seek out certified guides:

AMGA Certified Guides come from many different backgrounds and have a variety of talents and ambitions but one thing unites them all: the desire to rise to their full potential, excel at what they do, and become the best mountain guide they can be. AMGA training allows mountain guides to realize these desires. As a U.S. member of the IFMGA (International Federation of Mountain Guides Association), our certified guides have undergone rigorous training and examination that meets and exceeds international standards.

Building a relationship and getting involved with an AMGA Certified Guide or Accredited Program is a great way to gain mastery of climbing and skiing technical skills or reach the summit of your heart’s desire. AMGA guides bring a unique set of characteristics to the mountains. With a combination of great personality, a focus on maximizing client reward, excellent teaching ability, and emphasis on safety, our guides are sure to improve your mountain experiences.

At Chicks, we believe that certified guides represent the best guide training there is – and that is why we only hire certified guides.  Amongst our ownership team, Angela Hawse and Karen Bockel are both IFMGA Certified, meaning they have passed rigorous exams in Rock, Alpine, and Ski disciplines… they pretty much have a Ph.D. in guiding. Dawn Glanc is Certified in both Rock and Alpine disciplines, and Elaina Arenz is a Certified Rock Guide and Apprentice Alpine Guide. Besides certification, we value education and improving oneself. Personally, I am looking forward to taking pro level avalanche courses this winter.

So here’s to those who dare to follow their dreams.

Here’s to education, training, and experience to enable those dreams. As Albert Schweitzer said, “The tragedy of life is what dies inside a man while he lives”. Carry on, Sisters and never stop learning.

Forging Self-Reliance

One cold, windy day many years ago Jay Smith, Doug Hall, and I eagerly donned our packs and began post-holing up a gully to do a first ascent of an ice route that rarely comes in.  The new snow was not particularly deep, but the gully was steep so we took turns breaking trail.  We were nearing the base of the climb and the wind had begun to howl overhead. My partners had stopped to pull out the 7ml tag line and were looking for an anchor.  “What’s up?” I asked, knowing full well that they were roping up because they were afraid of the avalanche danger and hoped a belay would save their lives should an avalanche drop down on us from above.  “If it’s that bad, I am going down!” I exclaimed.  After a lengthy discussion, Jay and Doug packed up the rope and followed me down the gully.  Because of my taking a stand, we did not make the first ascent.  The slope above never avalanched, but we will never know if the gully would have slid with our weight on it.

Still, I wanted to know more.  Was I being too conservative?  Was my tolerance for risk below those of my partners?  Perhaps the rope and anchor (a scrawny tree) would have held in an avalanche.  I consulted with a local avalanche expert and he stated that if he were in my shoes, he would have expressed the same concerns as I and retreated.  I realized that both Jay and Doug had listened to my arguments intently that day and had not treated me any differently because I had a lower testosterone level.  Any thoughts of personal doubts were ones that I brought on myself.

When Kim Reynolds started Chicks Climbing and Skiing nineteen years ago, she noticed plenty of women, in the Ouray Ice Park, climbing with men.  What bothered her was the fact that they were not leading or setting up anchors. They relied on their more experienced partners. 

Since 1999, Chicks has been working to increase the skill and knowledge base in women in rock, ice, and alpine climbing and most recently – backcountry skiing.  Recently, my four Chicks partners and I were discussing our purpose.  We had to narrow it down to two words.  We settled upon Forging Self-Reliance.  Brilliant!

Learning to Trust

What fundamental traits make for a successful rock climber? Many veterans of the sport would say leadership, adaptability, strength, confidence, patience, and composure, to name a few. None of which are traits that I would consider to be strengths of my own. I, on the other hand, am cautious and introverted. I meticulously analyze every decision and tirelessly plan for any scenario I might find myself in. I cringe at being the center of attention or when I am tasked with leading. In my recent years I’ve resented that about myself so I’ve begun making a conscious effort to step out of my comfort zone. Learning to trust myself and gain confidence were two things I hoped to accomplish with a trip to Red Rocks in Nevada for a weekend of rock climbing with Chicks.

My name is Chelsea Cordes and I am a Registered Dietitian in Memphis, TN. Dietitians are notoriously type A, we do not like surprises, we thrive in environments conducive to organization and which warrant endless hours of planning. We are, to be blunt, obnoxiously diligent and effective employees, but terribly uncomfortable with uncertainty or anything out of our control.

I mention this because outdoor recreational activities aren’t exactly environments which allow you to have much control. In the wilderness, mother nature is the boss. So you can see how I would naturally have an aversion to anything remotely unpredictable like rock climbing. Learning to trust was going to be a challenge for me.

But, as a person who also has a deep love for being active, solving puzzles, connecting with nature, and challenging myself, I fell in love with the sport, or at least the very controlled and comfortable version which I had been exposed to.

Close to six months ago a friend invited me to try it for the first time. It was with wide eyes that I walked in to find a 30-foot tall wall speckled with bright fluorescent climbing holds, and from the moment I tried it, I loved it.

So for months I would climb on that little wall every chance I had, and I would try to glean as much from the more experienced climbers as possible. For months I waited to be invited to go climbing outside, and, luckily for me, it eventually happened. I got a taste of what it’s like to climb on real limestone where I could soak up the beautiful views surrounding me and feel the sharp edge of rock dig into my hands. I loved it.

I wanted to go every weekend, and every weekend I didn’t get invited I was disappointed. Until one day when it occurred that I was being too passive. If I really wanted to grow, I needed to push myself instead of relying on others. So I turned to Google. “Okay Google, tell me where I can find some badass women that rock climb who can teach me everything I need to know.”

Chicks Climbing & Skiing popped up. After reviewing each option in thorough detail (true to form), I booked my trip to travel with Chicks to Red Rock, Nevada at the end of March 2017. It was in no time that I was making my way to the airport, climbing gear in tow and eager to begin my journey. When I arrived at the house in Las Vegas I was greeted by smiling women hauling loads of generously donated demo equipment.

petzl spirit screwlockHelmets, backpacks, shoes, harnesses, you name it, all at our disposal to be tested for the remainder of the week.  It was a gear junkie’s dream. And it didn’t take long for me to notice shiny blue Patagonia travel cases carefully spaced on the dining room table, one for each of us bursting with goodies. When the time finally came for us to open them, I felt nostalgic, like a kid on Christmas morning picking through my stocking all over again. The contents included everything from Petzl Spirit Screwlock carabiner to an Osprey Pack 6L dry sack. I was pleasantly surprised.

The house wasn’t bad either. And by not bad I mean very well decorated, clean, and spacious. I was fully expecting to be slumming it for four days but what I got instead was a very relaxing retreat after each day of adventure. I had a room to myself, a queen bed to lounge on, and five pillows to doze with. Awww yeah!

As more women began to filter into the house I introduced myself and quickly learned my guides for the trip were Dawn Glanc and Elaina Arenz. It didn’t take long for their high level of expertise and climbing knowledge to be evidently clear.

red rock accommodationsOur first night in the house the ladies called a meeting among appetizers to go over the general plan for the trip. At this time both Dawn and Elaina gave us a little history and a background into their climbing experience. They also tasked us each with determining a measurable goal for our trip which they promised to help us achieve.

As I sat and listened to each of the women at the table divulge a little about themselves and their personal goals, I couldn’t help but feel inspired. Some of us had less experience than others *cough* me *cough*, some of us were mothers, some of us had worked in Antarctica and some of us were recovering from serious disabling injuries and were looking for a climbing rebirth. 

At the end of the night, each of us decided on a goal.

My goal was a bit broad-I wanted more confidence. Confidence to feel like I could take others out to climb rather than relying on being invited, which meant learning to lead and learning to trust myself.

Leading to me at this point was the big scary monster lurking under my bed. I had been climbing outdoors before, but I had only ever top roped with the exception of one very low graded route which I “lead” on.

The idea of falling above my anchor on a sheer face of rock terrified me. The dietitian in me wanted to prepare and train as best I could before even attempting to lead to eliminate the risk of falling altogether. I quickly learned that would not be possible.

Over the course of three days our guides were very diligent about answering our questions, keeping us safe, and guaranteeing us fun. Dawn was particularly good at teaching the technical aspects of climbing and did an exceptional job of explaining the ‘why’ portion of everything we were doing. Not to mention, Dawn is an excellent cook (as a person who chose to center her career around food, I would know.)

And Elaina had a very calming and therapeutic energy which made scary situations incredibly more manageable. At the end of the trip I felt like asking her to be my full time psychologist.

The first incident when it was abundantly clear that I could trust my guides was day one about 10 minutes into the trip when we hiked to our crag under wind advisory. It was surprisingly very cold for being late March in the midday desert, and I needed cold weather gear, something I had questioned about the packing list I had received prior to leaving. I later learned that trust would be a recurrent force of momentum for the remainder of my little adventure.

Day one we went over the basics of climbing. Day two we got a more technical experience building anchors and learning to lead belay with a Grigri. I’ll admit, I had my reservations about the Grigri starting the trip but that later changed. There’s that recurring theme of needing to trust my guides again.

But what was most beneficial to me on day two was the practice we did mock leading and falling. That’s right, intentionally falling… but in small incremental steps. Dawn volunteered me to go first. She had me climb up the route and bounce around a bit to get comfortable, then the more intimidating instruction came.

“Just climb up to that third bolt, step up like you are reaching for a hold and fall back into a seated chair position,” she said nonchalantly.

“Oh you want me to climb all the way up there … Okay?” I replied with obvious trepidation. And while I was nervous about it and apparently frightened, the voice in my head reminded me to trust my guides.

I climbed to the third bolt, took three deep breaths, and on the third exhalation, I let myself sit back. Just like that it was over with and to my surprise it was actually pretty fun. We did it again, and again, and again, until the fear vanished completely.

Whohoo! I felt so relieved. One small step for beginner climber, one giant leap for overbearing, controlling, and paranoid personality types womankind.  Until day three.

On day three Elaina challenged our group with the final test. We were to do everything-put the rope up, belay one another, clean the route, everything. Elaina picked the first route, and when I saw what we would be leading, the fear started trickling back in.

Looking out into the vast open space of desert below it became apparently clear that I was not in Memphis. The routes were easily twice the height of what I was climbing back home not to mention they were up on a legitimate mountain. The only other routes I had climbed outside were little bluffs which you could easily see the anchor on.

People were clambering up and down the path along the wall, bounding across boulders with excitement and conversing about which routes to select. I began to feel like my inexperience was palpable.

And so the two other women in my group lead our first route before me, each of which sent it with relative ease. Then it was my turn. With my confidence dwindling I asked to mock lead it first and did it relatively well, with no slips or hesitation at least. Next it was time for the real deal and Elaina had offered to belay me.

I climbed past the first bolt and up to the second no issues. Gazing up above me I spotted the crux of the climb and the fear came rushing in. Nothing had changed about the route, it was the exact same one I climbed mere moments before with no problems. Why was I suddenly afraid?

As I let the fear wash over me it began to be visibly obvious in my hands and legs. People walking up the path were probably unsure if it was me or Elvis climbing the way my legs were shaking uncontrollably.

“Breathe” I heard from Elaina below.

“Oh yeah! Duh! You have to breath Chels” I thought to myself.

So I took some controlled breaths and a back step, looked around at my options and came up with a plan. I began to climb again only to get to the same spot I had stopped before. Fondling the rock in hopes a magical jug would appear from nowhere, the doubt and fear crept in again.

So I took a back step and some more controlled breaths, and the same sequence occurred for several minutes over and over again. And in the midsts of being coached and encouraged through the problem I had an epiphany.

Trust.

I need to simply trust, trust my feet as I had been told several times, trust my belayer and guide, trust myself that I could do this.

And with that momentum I stepped up on my right foot to reach for the next hold, all doubt and fear aside, only relying on trust, and…. I fell. And not only did I fall once, but I fell at that same spot at least three more times.

I know, that was a bit anticlimactic and is not how these stories are supposed to go, but that was the most influential and valuable detail of my whole experience with Chicks.

The falling was a little scary but nothing like the horrific event I had pictured in my mind. And I was perfectly fine, not a scratch on me. Eventually I figured out a way to get past that move and finish the route.

But falling on a lead unplanned did so much more for me than sending the route with ease. It removed some of that crippling fear I had of anticipating my first fall. It reminded me that it is okay that I’m still a brand new climber with a lot to learn. And, it allowed Elaina to personally coach me through my greatest challenge which turned out not to be physical or technical at all, it was all in my head.

The strategies I learned to deal with that mental challenge will be essential for me far beyond the sport of rock climbing. They’re concepts which will help me to be a less controlling, anxious, and doubtful person in general.

At the end of the day, nobody waltzes up to a wall and climbs it perfectly every time regardless of whatever inherent characteristics you possess. It’s more about growing in confidence and trust in knowing that you are equipped to figure out what the answer is to your next big project, that’s ultimately what it means to be a successful rock climber.

Ironically, I think I left the trip feeling more proud of myself for falling on a lead than I would have if I sent it with no problems. I sure as hell learned a lot more about myself which is exactly what I was looking for.

The amazing thing about the guides with Chicks is, they will help you safely and effectively navigate the space between comfort and discomfort, and within that very narrow space is where the learning and growing happens.

No matter what your goal is big or small, or whether you realize it at all, Chicks can help you achieve it.

Real Chick: Dede Rosenburg, Subaru Scholarship Winner 2016

Last year I was the lucky winner of one of Subaru Adventure Team’s big prizes: a trip to City of Rock in Idaho to attend a climbing clinic put on by Chicks Climbing. In the spring, a friend of mine told me about the essay contest SAT was having. He thought it would be right up my alley, and it was! I have been an aspiring mountaineer for many years and the one piece I was working hard at (but struggling with in Minnesota!) was rock climbing. I wrote my essay and submitted my photos. For days after, I talked about how amazing it would be to have this opportunity. And as more days went by, it sort of fell off my radar. Like contests do. Much to my surprise, months later, I received an email that I had in fact won. And that I had two weeks to figure everything out for travel, because Idaho was calling! And there was no way I would miss out on such a rare and rad event.

In order to get to Idaho from Minnesota, I had to drive by so many beautiful parts of the country. So naturally this turned into a glorious road trip of National Parks and National Forests. Dirtbagging steadily out west. Surviving on quick oats, tuna packets and instant coffee. It was bliss. Every day that I woke up, I was somewhere new and glorious. And so aware that none of this would have been possible without winning the climbing scholarship.

When I got to City of Rock, I was greeted with some special sights that I didn’t expect at all. Prior to this, I had no clue how lovely and rugged Idaho was. I was dazzled and honestly, quite scared for my car; a 10 year old Chevy Aveo that has seen more wilderness than most of the people I know! The color of this landscape was bright gold, with splashes of green and red. The sky a pop of blue with puffs of white cloud. The air was hot and dry and sensational. Getting to the parking lot, I saw a sign that I recognized directing me towards a campsite about a quarter of a mile in.

My things for the next few days were unloaded and I was left for the weekend. I began to set up my tent and organize my gear as some of the other ladies rolled in and began to do the same. I was struck by how windy our private site was. Putting my sleep system together, everything hit me all at once; how lucky I had been to win this opportunity, how wonderful it was that it all worked out- my job agreed, my car agreed, everything was lining up in a lovely way. When I finished setting up and emerged from the tent, I was pretty surprised to see that most everyone was doing the same. We were asked to come around the fire ring in a few to do intros and get the lay of the next few days. I think this is the part I was most nervous for at the time. I had realized while in my tent, that most of these women seemed to know one another. Through hearing them chit chatting and talking about past climbing adventures. I was a little apprehensive about being the only woman to have won my way there. And about very clearly being the least experienced climber.

During intros, my mind was eased by the friendly nature of everyone there. We all chatted some and were given very fun “gift bags” that were actually just wonderful presents- a bag from Patagonia, a hat from OR, a few Petzl items and many little items for skin care and climbing. Totally unexpected and very appreciated. We had some dinner and retired to our tents for the night. We had a big day ahead of us, with a pretty early start!

The next morning I woke up feeling refreshed and emerged from my tent to a pre-sunrise City of Rock. No one else was awake, so I took to opportunity to take a sunrise stroll down the main roads of the area. It was warm with a cool breeze and the sky was slowly turning into a rainbow of painted colors that reflected vividly off of the rock that surrounded everything. I returned to camp and was greeted by Chick Guides, Angela and Aimee, who were busy starting to get coffee going and arranging the table for breakfast. We had some great conversation and the other ladies began to rise. Breakfast was a lot of coffee and many food choices, served up buffet style. There was something for everyone, including gluten free options. I don’t think anyone ever went hungry during the next few days- between our ample breakfasts and dinners that were provided, most of us brought hearty lunches and many snacks.

Day one of climbing began with some lessons on ropes, knots and basic safety. We went over gear and were able to test out various shoes, helmets and anything else you might need! I enjoyed this part of the day. I have some sports arthritis in my left foot and have difficulty finding climbing shoes that feel okay. I tend to stay loyal to specific brands and being able to try on and use alternative brands was awesome. I particularly liked a pair of Scarpas- not too aggressive and wide enough for my crazy foot. I was most comfortable with gym-climbing at the time and had no idea what slab climbing was. Enter: the slab climbing crash course.

I was so timid about this style of climbing. Quite frankly, I don’t think I’ve ever shown such restraint in a new physical pursuit. Between the new kind of exposure and the uncertainty of almost nothing to hold on to, I had some trouble. I took two attempts at two different routes that morning. I found a lot of peace watching the other women climb, noticing the technique they used and paying close attention to where they were putting hands and feet on this seemingly very smooth but sticky rock. Smearing was everything. Using your hands to balance was everything. I took note and rested my foot a bit. I had one more attempt, using some of what I saw the other women doing, and was stunned by the reaction I had to the exposure as I climbed higher. It was enough to call it a day for me- so many new emotions and observations! Angela could tell I was feeling a little uncomfortable and took me aside to practice smearing on a small boulder nearby. “Trust the gear” was something she said a few times. And I realized that was something that I had never been told before and it was not something I had ever done. I understood using gear, but until that point I didn’t understand that to use it properly, you must trust it. This little lesson boosted my confidence and gave me something to really look forward to for the following day.

Later that day, I was given the opportunity to belay a few times. It was a great rest for my tired foot and a fun way to get to know some of the ladies more. We were out on the rock for many hours and when we wrapped it up for the evening, hunger set in. There was a big healthy feast and we all gathered together to discuss our day and our plans for the next day. We decided to go to Castle Rocks State Park, which was very nearby and would hopefully provide much more shade.

When we went to bed that evening, everything from the day caught up with me and I slumbered. Hard. I woke up around sunrise and again, had some great conversation with Angela and Aimee. We had breakfast and hit the road- it was a short drive to the state park and a beautiful walk to the area we would be climbing at. I was shocked to see so many flowers and so many lizards. I also noted the couple rogue cows grazing the field and hanging out near the trail. It all felt a little surreal. We set up our ropes and began climbing. I belayed a bit and learned a lot in doing so. Any time I had a question it was answered and many tips were given to make the task easier and more comfortable. When it was time for me to attempt climbing for the day, the exposure got me good. Only this time I was encouraged from below by everyone and I went a little further than before. I knew what I had to do and how to do it, but my muscles and brain were fighting with one another. My calves gave out before my brain allowed me to get much higher. The sun was hot. I felt overstimulated. It was time for me to sit back, investigate gear, take some photos and have a bite to eat.

Later in the day I sent my first wall. It is still something I am very proud of. I was scared and unsure, but I was determined to complete a route on this trip. Even if it was one route. Going from never slab climbing to jumping right on in; I counted it as a major victory. The wind was so strong, my rope was whipping all over. I couldn’t decide if it was best to look up, down or to either side. Eventually I decided to just keep it simple, with eyes pointing only to where I needed to go. When I topped out, I could just barely hear some friends cheering below. Seemingly just as happy I was for this overcoming of fear and powering through.

It is immensely difficult to be vulnerable and not your best in front of new people. But there was no judgement, only kindness. Praise over and over again. Reminders from everyone that we all start somewhere and usually it’s from a place of complete unknowing. I took all of these encouraging and gentle words and to this day, remember them often.

After climbing, most of the ladies went to the local hot springs. I didn’t come prepared for that and stayed behind at camp. The plan was to read, write and reflect on the past couple days. But that is not how it worked out. In The City, cellphone service is quite hard to come by. As it turned out, friends and family had been trying to get ahold of me for a while. There was a family emergency back in Minnesota and before I was able to comprehend any of it, my boyfriend arrived at our camp to break this news, help me pack up quickly and make the long drive home. An imperfect ending to a life changing few days. I had made connections, achieved goals and learned so much. It felt like a haze to leave in such a rapid and surprising manner.

It’s been a handful of months since my scholarship to City of Rocks. So much has changed in my life. Profound changes that have been difficult, scary and often times like groping around in the dark. And I have thought about my time in Idaho constantly. I learned more in those days about climbing than I could possibly imagine. From technique, to language, to gear. I was able to learn about the outdoor industry in a deeper way. And I was encouraged to chase my dreams; live my life wildly and fully. I felt supported in a group of women. It was a beautiful and inspiring thing. I daydream about how excited I was when I topped out. How shocked and proud I was. It is empowering beyond words to defeat fears so big. I carry that feeling with me whenever I face sticky situations in daily life. Normal struggle seems a hell of a lot easier to handle when you’ve battled your own mind in a dangerous situation. And being supported by these strong and athletic women is empowering in a different way. I find that these days I am a bit more encouraging of others. I trust a little easier and open up a little quicker. I feel a safety with women that I never had before.

I grew leaps and bounds in The City. In many ways, my life began there. Or rather, I evolved into someone else there. Someone I care for and appreciate more. A grown woman who is braver and calmer and unafraid of the unknown. Climbing will always be a large part of my life and through this clinic, I have knowledge, confidence and a higher skill level to propel me further. Prior to this, I didn’t know slab climbing. Since that time, I have used this skill countless times. It is a technique I am proud of. My time spent in Idaho was raw and magical. It is an experience that is constantly teaching me lessons and that I will remember for the rest of my life. I am excited to return some day to conquer more fears, develop further and reminisce on the crazy few days I spent with Chicks Climbing.

Words and photos: Dede Rosenburg

Skills without the Frills


Are you one who would rather forego the cost of a shared house and would prefer to tell stories around a campfire, feel a soft warm breeze blow across your face, and gaze at the stars? Cell service is limited to nonexistent so this is your chance to unplug from your reality and recharge your internal battery. If this sounds like your cup of tea, we have planned a couple of  programs at world-class sport climbing destinations just for you – at City of Rocks, Rifle and Maple Canyon.

All three areas feature a plethora of classic routes at all grades, and you will be grouped with a few others who share similar experience and goals. Expect to improve your climbing skills, and enjoy the camaraderie of like-minded women in a safe, fun, and supportive environment. These all women rock climbing trips will focus on the movement skills needed to advance to the next level of climbing; yet they are distinctly different:

City of Rocks, IDAHO:

In City of Rocks, you will find granite domes, with an emphasis on footwork and balance on technical face, slabs and cracks. Friction is the name of the game here and you will practice working on your balance, moving efficiently by shifting your center of gravity and learning how to jam your hands in the cracks. There is also an optional multi-pitch day which is perfect for anyone who would like to experience that for the first time. Either way, you will come away from this weekend moving more fluidly and gracefully. More


Rifle, COLORADO:

Rifle Mountain Park in Western Colorado is a narrow limestone canyon tucked back in the forest. The approach is just minutes from the parking area and the area is filled with blocky features that will teach you how to use opposition forces in your climbing movement. It’s a great area for those learning to lead and practice common sport climbing tactics like stick clipping, projecting skills, cleaning steep routes and taking clean falls. More


Maple Canyon, UTAH:

Maple CanyonIn Maple Canyon, you will find walls composed of cobbles of all sizes which are mortered together to create a 3-D climbing experience. You will find pockets in-between the cobbles, sloping handholds from grapefruit to medicine ball size, crimps and edges on the broken cobbles and almost everything inbetween.

There are vertical faces to climb as well as wildly overhanging routes to practice steep climbing technique like drop knees and back-stepping. Not sure what that means? Well join us and our team of female guides will show you the secrets to successfully climbing this unique rock. More

Alpine Climbing Summer Escape

“Mom, wake up!”, I hear my 12 year old son urgently whisper in my ear.  We are at high camp on the north side of Mt Baker and I had over-slept.  I turned on my headlamp and lit up the stove to make a cup of coffee, pulled a jacket out of my stuff sack (which was used as my pillow) and handed Grady his Chalpine climbingeerios.  After a quick breakfast in bed, we roped up and grabbed our packs,  which were under the watchful eye of the snowman he had made the previous day.   Following frozen tracks under a full moon, we climbed towards the summit.  The sound of my breath, in rhythm with the crunch of the snow under foot, the soft cool breeze on my face, and the ever-expansive views , as always, lead my soul away from the bustle of modern society.  I have eagerly anticipated sharing this alpine climbing experience with my teenager so that he might discover the same solace in the mountains should the need arise.

But mountains are being endangered by climate change. On May 29, I was part of the Climate Change March in Durango, Colorado and gave the keynote speech.  The mountain environment, which seemingly offered me permanence in a changing world, has become a litmus test for climate change.  So what can each of us do?  There is tremendous power in voting for the environment and purchasing only from businesses that are environmentally responsible. We can also adopt lifestyles that embrace minimalism, or voluntary simplicity.

One of the lessons I have learned through alpine climbing is the basic tenet of minimalism. A feeling of freedom I get through understanding the things I can do without, and a greater appreciation for what I have. Furthermore, as the www.simplicitycollective.com website states:

“Voluntary simplicity is a way of life that rejects the high-consumption, materialistic lifestyles of consumer cultures.  It does not mean living in poverty, becoming a monk, or indiscriminately rejecting all the advantages of science and technology.  Rather, by examining afresh our relationships with money, material possessions, the planet, ourselves and each other, the simple life of voluntary simplicity is about discovering the freedom and contentment that comes with knowing how much is truly enough.”

Thus the alpine climbing summer escape becomes not only a way of extracting ourselves from cars, phones, money, and computers, but also a way of re-focusing on what makes our lives the richest.

Alpine Climbing: Tetons vs Baker

It’s all alpine climbing, so what’s the difference?

This Summer Chicks will be offering two alpine climbing clinics. The term alpine climbing is very vague. This can mean anything from walking on snow to vertical rock climbing and everything in between. Let’s explore the difference between the Grand Teton and Mt Baker alpine climbing programs so you can decide which one is best for you.

All of the Chicks Climbing programs are here to help you reach your greater climbing goals. If you want to climb volcanos in far off lands, or big glaciated peaks in the Himalaya, our alpine courses will give you the skills you need to get to the summit. Be sure to join us this summer to become an independent alpine climber. The Mountains are calling you!

alpine climbing tetonsThe Teton Alpine Program is based in Grand Teton National Park just outside of Jackson, Wyoming. The curriculum will focus on the skills one must have to climb the Grand Teton or any other alpine rock objective.

The goal is to learn the skills needed to assess terrain, travel on steep snow an  low angle to steep alpine rock.

 

 

mt baker alpine climbingThe Mount Baker Program is based in the North Cascades in Washington State. The curriculum will focus on skills needed to climb glaciated peaks. Mt Baker is the third highest peak in Washington and it’s an active stratovolcano with a summit elevation of 10,781ft.

The goal is to learn how to travel safely on low angle ice, snow and glaciated terrain. Including skills like glacier camping, crampon use, navigation, steep snow climbing and crevasse rescue.

 

 

 

lower saddle grand teton

 

The Teton Alpine Basecamp will spend a couple of nights in the Exum Hut at the saddle below the Grand Teton. The hut is located at approximately 11,000 ft. The day starts in the valley floor and rises into Garnett Canyon. The hike to this hut is about 7.5 miles long with an altitude gain of 5000 ft. Your pack will be between 30-40 lbs.

The Teton program utilizes the Exum hut, that is stocked with sleeping bags, sleeping pads and all the needed cooking gear.

 

 

mt baker basecampThe Mount Baker Basecamp may be on the glacier, depending on the snow levels. The camp is located between 6,500- 7,000 ft. The hike to camp is about 4-5 hours, and your pack will be between 50-60 lbs. You must carry everything you need for the week on your back.

The Mount Baker program is quite different. You carry everything you need in your packs. Everyone must dig camp into the snow, including your kitchen shelter.

 

 

 

 

If we compare the climbing on the two mountains, we can see that they are very different. Technically, both the Tetons and the North Cascades have glaciers. However, the crevasses (giant cracks on and underneath the surface of the snow) in the Cascades present a different set of skills to navigate safely through the terrain as a member of a roped team.

teton headwallThe Grand Teton requires steep snow climbing skills and the ability to rock climb in mountain boots. The Teton Alpine Climbing Program will have more emphasis on climbing alpine rock which is accessed via shorter stretches of glaciated terrain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

mt baker glacierMount Baker requires steep snow climbing and glacier travel skills to reach the summit. The Baker clinic will focus on glacier travel skills, including navigation, terrain selection and crevasse rescue.

Why We Love Maple Canyon

Maple CanyonImagine, a long never ending dry river bed. One full of river stones rounded to perfection by the water. The stones are glued into place by the dried sediment. Now imagine the river bed oriented vertically, and in some cases slightly overhanging. The glued stones become perfect cobbles waiting to be climbed. The smooth slopers, rounded side pulls, and even missing cobbles make up the maze of holds on the unique cemented sediment walls. This is what rock climbing in Maple Canyon is like. It is a sport climber’s paradise that feels like a climbing gym where Mother Nature sculpted the perfect jugs herself.

Join Chicks this summer to challenge your skills on this amazing rock type. This clinic is perfect for the climber looking to move from the gym to the crag. Our guides will give you the goals and confidence to tie in to the sharp end and take on higher grades.

We will focus on sport climbing skills that will help you take on your next project. Our supportive environment will encourage you at whatever grade or challenge you choose to take on. Top rope and lead climbing will be available.

What are you waiting for? Space is limited, sign up today.

Which Ice Climbing Clinic Is Best For You?

If you have the following questions regarding our ice climbing clinics, you are not alone.

  • Ice ClimbingWhat if I don’t have any gear, or experience in ice climbing?
  • How am I going to stay out all day and not get cold?
  • What if I am not fit enough?
  • What if I haven’t climbed in a while and can’t climb as well as I used to?
  • What if I am afraid of heights?
  • What if I am placed in a group of women that climb better than me?
  • What if I want to learn to lead?

All of our Ouray-based Ice Climbing Clinics are for all levels, you will be placed in groups of women with similar experience, the guide-to-guest ratio is 4:1 so the instruction is tailored to you, and we have demo gear and clothing.  Which course you choose is more a matter of time and expense.  Obviously, the longer the course, the more you will learn, but our four day Complete is just as suitable for a beginner as it is for an advanced climber and vice-versa.

If you are interested in an adventure and learning more about multi-pitch climbing in the backcountry, then Cody or Iceland are just for you.  These clinics are for those who know the basics and are ready to learn to be more efficient as a follower on a multi-pitch climb.  These clinics are also for those who already lead and want to observe a guide’s decision process regarding choosing the objective, gear selection, route finding, weather and snow analysis, and efficient climbing and descent strategies.

As your goals change, we are here to help you reach the next level and our courses are designed to optimize that experience.  Join us!

What is backcountry and why is it so awesome?

BACKCOUNTRY SKIING Q & A WITH CHICKS GUIDES NORIE KIZAKI AND KAREN BOCKEL

Backcountry SkiingChicks:  Let’s start with the basics:  What is backcountry skiing?

KB:  It’s skiing outside and away from a ski resort, on unmarked, ungroomed, and unpatrolled snow slopes.  It’s my favorite kind of skiing!  Usually, you have to earn your turns by hiking uphill to get to the top of the run.  You need special equipment, including climbing skins that attach to the bottom of your skis, ski boots that have a walk mode, and avalanche rescue gear.  You also need skills to navigate the snow-covered mountains beyond the resort.

Chicks:  Why is backcountry skiing so special?

NK:  Backcountry skiing is special because it can take us to places where we could not go otherwise. Skinning can take us a longer distance in a shorter amount of time than being on foot.  Though there is mechanized skiing in the backcountry these days, if we are talking about human powered skiing, the cost of equipment has become reasonable for most people. It is the oldest, purest and simplest method to enjoy skiing.  It was the only way for me to ski every day in winter growing up.  The very best part of backcountry skiing is the relationships you develop with people you ski with, whether they are clients, friends or your significant other.  When I think of backcountry skiing, the first thing that comes to my mind is the people with whom I have shared joyful moments.

Chicks:   What is your favorite backcountry skiing range?

KB:  The San Juan Mountains!  This is where I learned to ski (and be!) in the mountains, and therefore they are really close to my heart.  It’s where I cut my teeth, and where learned about snow and avalanches.  The high alpine terrain is just beautiful.  There are endless opportunities for big and small ski tours with good access off the high passes such as Red Mountain Pass.  The snowpack can be challenging, but when we get blue skies and powder, it’s dreamy out there.

NK:Japan!  That is where I am from.That is where I speak the language and understand the culture. That is where I do most of my ski guiding.  That is where I share joy and laughter with many of my clients, friends and my husband.  That is where I excel and can provide the best skiing experience to my clients.  I look forward to many more years of skiing and ski guiding in Japan.

Chicks:  Who can go backcountry skiing with Chicks?

KB:   Good question!  If you are an intermediate to advanced alpine skier or snowboarder, you can join Chicks with Stix.  For our Backcountry Skiing clinic on Red Mountain Pass, no prior backcountry experience is required – this course will teach you all about the backcountry!  It’s perfect for someone wanting to explore the backcountry for the first time, or for refreshing basic backcountry skills.  The Bird is also a great way to explore powder skiing in the San Juans – via helicopter!  No backcountry experience is required for this clinic either, but the pace will be a little faster and there is opportunity for lots of vertical.  If you’ve ever thought about trying heliskiing, this is the perfect intro.  By the way, we have a good description of our ski levels on our website.

NK: In terms of our In Deep trip to Japan, you would want to be intermediate resort skiers or rider, and you would want to have a few days of powder skiing experience. If you are an intermediate skier, you can learn to ski in powder quickly.  Guides can instruct you on how to ski in deep powder efficiently.  Besides skiing ability, if you enjoy the experience of a different culture and food, you will have a great time!

Chicks:  When is the best time to go backcountry skiing?

KB:  Each mountain range has their season.  Right now, at the beginning of the December, the snow cover is thin and more dangerous here in the San Juans and in the Tetons.  By January, things begin to fill in, and good skiing can be found in many areas – but always watch the avalanche danger!  In March, the sun begins to warm up the snow, and we transition into spring skiing – the time to go up high, ski big peaks and big lines.  Each part of the season has its challenges.  Make sure you and your partners are prepared.  Going with Chicks is a great way to learn from AMGA/IFMGA guides and get the best training possible!

Chicks:  Tell us about your favorite backcountry skiing day.

NK:Every day I go out is my favorite day.  I enjoy skiing with my husband whether it is a mellow tree skiing day or it is a 50-degree couloir type of day.  We also had awesome days with the Chicks In Deep last year in Hokkaido, Japan, skiing some amazing lines and laughing so hard that my stomach was hurting.   If you know me, I cannot stop smiling when I am skiing.